Hard Times: Earning a Living by the Road Side

Photo: A man putting on a respiratory mask and a woman with surgical gloves sell potatoes by the road side along Kirkman road, Harare on the 15th of April 2019. Zimbabwe is currently in a 21 day lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. During the lockdown people are mandatorily required to stay at home so that the spreading of the virus is stopped. However, the government has not put in place compensating measures to cushion people from loss of income during this time. People are therefore putting themselves and others at risk of contracting the virus as they are resuming their ways of earning a living lest their families starve. As of today, close to two million people world wide contracted the virus, five hundred thousand have recovered whilst one hundred and thirty have died.

God Has Heard My Prayers

woman carrying plastic paper backs on her head

The years had been hard and full of toil. Over those years, she had never stopped to think of how much things had changed since her husband’s untimely death. So when her only son, Zviroto, married, she had cried, danced and ululated with joy. “Mwari mandiona. Kudzwai Jehovha. Munoona shirikadzi”. She had even written a letter to her brother Tobias in Umtali of the growth of the family. But alas, what started with tears of joy slowly turned into years of sheer, unmet expectancy. That unfulfilled yearning for her son to have a child slowly turned into a somewhat conviction she would not get to hold her son’s child. This scary thought made her withdraw into her cocoon. But she never stopped praying… *** So when the letter from Zviroto had come that evening, telling her they now had a son after many years of barrenness, she never wasted time. That next morning, the first bus that passed through the village found her already standing impatiently under the giant musasa tree.  

Accident Scene

Accident Scene As I went home, the setting sun blew a beautiful yellowish haze that marked the end of another savanna day. The traffic coming into town had significantly diminished, save for commuter omnibuses that sped off, targeting the last urbaners. As I went uphill on a stretch, the serenity of the evening was suddenly bombarded by chaos. Another accident ……